Trials

  • February 29, 2024

    Mich. Judge Floats Sanctions If Doc Review Wastes Her Time

    A Michigan federal judge on Thursday warned attorneys for a water engineering firm accused of prolonging lead exposure in the Flint water crisis not to waste her time by improperly withholding unprotected documents related to its public relations strategy around the case.

  • February 29, 2024

    Feds Want To Ask Trump Jurors If 2020 Election Was 'Stolen'

    Florida federal prosecutors want to ask potential jurors in Donald Trump's classified documents case if they believe the 2020 election was "stolen" and if they hold opinions about how the FBI executed a highly publicized search warrant at his Mar-a-Lago resort.

  • February 29, 2024

    Medtronic Says 3 Years Of Tax Returns Under IRS Audit

    Three years of medical device company Medtronic's federal income tax returns are being audited by the Internal Revenue Service, the company said in a U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission filing.

  • February 28, 2024

    Brothers' 20-Year Calif. Real Estate Battle Ends In $7B Verdict

    A Los Angeles jury has awarded four brothers an estimated $7 billion verdict, finding that a fifth brother breached their contracts and his fiduciary duty to them by wrongly pushing them out of various business partnerships that included thousands of units of apartment buildings and a diamond venture. 

  • February 28, 2024

    Fla. Judge OKs $43.5M Deutsche Bank Deal In Ch. 15 Case

    A Florida bankruptcy judge on Wednesday approved a $43.5 million settlement between Deutsche Bank AG and liquidators for a group of Caribbean-based companies to resolve claims against the bank for its alleged role in a real estate Ponzi scheme targeting rich South Americans.

  • February 28, 2024

    Sbarro Worker Appeals 'Prejudiced' Verdict On Rape Claims

    A former Sbarro employee asked the Ninth Circuit on Wednesday to order a retrial on her allegations that she was sexually assaulted multiple times by a manager and co-workers, claiming a jury verdict favoring the company resulted from a trial tainted by prejudicial assertions, improper evidence and defamatory comments toward her and her counsel.

  • February 28, 2024

    Rochester Loses Telecom Fee Bench Trial Over Hearsay

    Verizon Communications and Crown Castle Fiber have won their fight with Rochester, New York, over how much the city can charge telecoms to do business after the New York federal judge overseeing the case declared the city's cost spreadsheet to be hearsay. 

  • February 28, 2024

    Judges Tell Mich. To Get Moving On Flint Engineering Suit

    Michigan federal and state judges on Wednesday told the state to speed up its professional malpractice case against an engineering firm accused of prolonging the Flint water crisis, saying Michigan can't worry about whether it would look bad to go ahead before residents resolve their federal claims.

  • February 28, 2024

    Textron, DJI End Texas Drone Patent Case After $279M Verdict

    A Texas federal judge has signed off on a notice by Textron Innovations Inc. and Chinese aerospace company SZ DJI Technology Co. Ltd. that they've agreed to dismiss a case in which DJI was found to have infringed Textron's drone patents and told to pay $279 million last year — the fourth-largest patent damages award of 2023.

  • February 28, 2024

    Indivior's $385M Suboxone Antitrust Deal Gets Final OK

    A Pennsylvania federal judge has granted final approval to Indivior's $385 million settlement with direct purchasers in antitrust litigation over its opioid addiction treatment Suboxone and awarded roughly $120 million in attorney fees to the purchasers' counsel.

  • February 28, 2024

    No Direct Evidence Ties 'Rust' Armorer To Live Ammo, Jury Told

    A New Mexico detective testified Wednesday in the involuntary manslaughter trial of "Rust" film armorer Hannah Gutierrez-Reed that investigators were unable to definitively show who brought live ammunition onto the movie's set before the fatal shooting of a cinematographer.

  • February 28, 2024

    Judge Clears Fujian Jinhua On Feds' Trade Secrets Claims

    A California federal judge has found that the federal government failed to show semiconductor-maker Fujian Jinhua Integrated Circuit Co. Ltd. is guilty of various claims in a suit accusing it of economic espionage in a trade secrets case.

  • February 28, 2024

    Supreme Court Will Decide Trump's Criminal Immunity Claim

    The U.S. Supreme Court said Wednesday it will review former President Donald Trump's claim that he is immune from federal charges related to interfering in the 2020 presidential election, setting oral arguments in the case for late April. 

  • February 28, 2024

    Google Attys' 'Fake Privilege' Comments Cited In Search Suit

    The U.S. Justice Department and states accusing Google of monopolizing the online-search market have asked a D.C. federal judge to consider internal chats disclosed in Epic Games' antitrust lawsuit that revealed Google's lawyers discussing "fake privilege" — a practice of unnecessarily involving a lawyer to make an exchange confidential.

  • February 28, 2024

    Trump Can't Freeze $465M Penalty But Can Seek Loans

    A New York state appellate judge on Wednesday refused to freeze the $465 million civil fraud judgment against Donald Trump while he appeals the award, but said the former president could take out loans to cover the cost of the judgment.  

  • February 28, 2024

    Justices Allow Idaho Execution, But State 'Unable To Proceed'

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday cleared the way for Idaho to execute a man for the murder of a fellow inmate, refusing to review his claim that Idaho's continued execution of prisoners whose death sentences were issued by judges and not juries violates the Eighth Amendment.

  • February 27, 2024

    Bankman-Fried Urges No More Than 6.5 Years For FTX Fraud

    FTX founder Sam Bankman-Fried asked a Manhattan federal judge late Tuesday for a sentence that releases him "promptly" after his conviction for stealing billions from customers of the now-collapsed crypto exchange, arguing that federal sentencing guidelines recommend no more than six-and-a-half years in prison.

  • February 27, 2024

    Eagles Rocker Testifies His Draft Lyrics Were Stolen, Hawked

    Eagles singer and lyricist Don Henley took the stand this week in the criminal case against three men who allegedly tried to sell what prosecutors say were the rock star's stolen draft lyric sheets, telling a state judge he never wanted anyone to see his creative "detritus."

  • February 27, 2024

    KPN Wins $287M Jury Verdict In Contract Beef With Samsung

    A Texas state jury has awarded $287 million to Dutch telecommunications company Koninklijke KPN in a contract dispute with Samsung Electronics Co., finding that Samsung breached a license agreement by refusing to pay for using a KPN patent, according to the verdict form.

  • February 27, 2024

    Supertramp Co-Founder Didn't Breach Royalty Deal, Jury Says

    A California federal jury on Tuesday found that Supertramp's co-founder did not breach a 1977 agreement to share his songwriting royalties with three former band members, ending a weeklong trial that revealed decades of resentment between the aging rockers who were one of the biggest bands of the late 1970s.

  • February 27, 2024

    'Rust' Armorer Regretted Not Checking Gun 'More,' Jury Hears

    A New Mexico state jury on Tuesday watched a law enforcement interview in which Hannah Gutierrez-Reed, armorer for the film "Rust," expressed remorse for not having more thoroughly checked a prop gun that went off in actor Alec Baldwin's hand, killing a cinematographer.

  • February 27, 2024

    J&J's CMO Says He Would've Pulled Talc If It Caused Cancer

    The chief medical officer at Johnson & Johnson told jurors Tuesday that his department's review of the scientific literature showed no link between baby powder use and ovarian cancer, saying he would have pulled the product from shelves if they'd found a link.

  • February 27, 2024

    PacifiCorp Faces $50M Ask In Latest Wildfire Trial

    Nine Oregonians and a summer camp for the disabled went to trial Tuesday in state court against PacifiCorp, asking a Portland jury to award at least $50 million after a cluster of 2020 wildfires left them with "nowhere to go, but nowhere to return to."

  • February 27, 2024

    'I Don't Know' When Ga. DA Romance Began, Witness Says

    The former law partner of Fulton County special prosecutor Nathan Wade, who oversees the election interference case against former President Donald Trump and his Georgia co-defendants, testified Tuesday that he didn't know when Wade's romantic relationship with District Attorney Fani T. Willis began.

  • February 27, 2024

    Wash. Judges Likely To Let Public Defender Keep Workplace Win

    A King County public defender who won a $7 million workplace harassment judgment against her bosses after she was stalked by a client found a receptive appeals panel Tuesday, as the Washington state judges pressed the county to explain how they could unwind a jury's factual findings.

Expert Analysis

  • 7 Common Myths About Lateral Partner Moves

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    As lateral recruiting remains a key factor for law firm growth, partners considering a lateral move should be aware of a few commonly held myths — some of which contain a kernel of truth, and some of which are flat out wrong, says Dave Maurer at Major Lindsey.

  • Series

    Cheering In The NFL Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Balancing my time between a BigLaw career and my role as an NFL cheerleader has taught me that pursuing your passions outside of work is not a distraction, but rather an opportunity to harness important skills that can positively affect how you approach work and view success in your career, says Rachel Schuster at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Opinion

    Compassionate Release Grants Needed Now More Than Ever

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    After the U.S. Sentencing Commission's recent expansion of the criteria for determining compassionate release eligibility, courts should grant such motions more frequently in light of the inherently dangerous conditions presented by increasingly understaffed and overpopulated federal prisons, say Alan Ellis and Mark Allenbaugh at the Law Offices of Alan Ellis.

  • Mitigating Whistleblower Risks After High Court UBS Ruling

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    While it is always good practice for companies to periodically review whistleblower trainings, policies and procedures, the U.S. Supreme Court’s recent whistleblower-friendly ruling in Murray v. UBS Securities helps demonstrate their importance in reducing litigation risk, say attorneys at Arnold & Porter.

  • Justices' Double Jeopardy Ruling Preserves Acquittal Sanctity

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    The U.S. Supreme Court’s unanimous decision last week in McElrath v. Georgia, barring the state from retrying a man acquitted of murder after a so-called repugnant verdict, is significant in the tangled web of double jeopardy jurisprudence for its brief and unequivocal protection of an acquittal’s finality, says Lissa Griffin at Pace Law School.

  • High Court Forfeiture Case Again Pits Text Against Purpose

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    In oral arguments Tuesday in McIntosh v. U.S., the U.S. Supreme Court will consider whether a federal court can impose asset forfeiture on a defendant even if it doesn’t comply with timing rules, which may affect the broader interpretation of procedural deadlines — and tees up the latest battle between textualism and purposivism, say Anden Chow and Christian Bale at MoloLamken.

  • 6 Pointers For Attys To Build Trust, Credibility On Social Media

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    In an era of information overload, attorneys can use social media strategically — from making infographics to leveraging targeted advertising — to cut through the noise and establish a reputation among current and potential clients, says Marly Broudie at SocialEyes Communications.

  • More Than Drugs At Stake In High Court's 'Blind Mule' Case

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's eventual decision in Diaz v. U.S., evaluating whether expert witnesses may testify that most defendants caught with drugs at the border know they are transporting drugs, could have implications for prosecuting everything from complex financial crimes to gun and drug cases, says Kenneth Notter at MoloLamken.

  • Why Fla. High Court Adopting Apex Doctrine Is Monumental

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    The Florida Supreme Court recently solidified the apex doctrine in the Sunshine State, an important development that extends the scope of the doctrine in the state to include both corporate and government officials, and formalizes the requirements for a high-level corporate official to challenge a request for a deposition, says Laura Renstrom at Holland & Knight.

  • A Refresher On Witness Testimony In 3 Key Settings

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    The recent controversy over congressional testimony from university presidents about antisemitism on campus serves as a reminder to attorneys about what to emphasize and avoid when preparing witnesses to testify before Congress, and how this venue differs from grand jury and trial proceedings, say Jack Sharman and Tyler Yarbrough at Lightfoot Franklin.

  • A Post-Mortem Analysis Of Stroock's Demise

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    After the dissolution of 147-year-old firm Stroock late last year shook up the legal world, a post-mortem analysis of the data reveals a long list of warning signs preceding the firm’s collapse — and provides some insight into how other firms might avoid the same disastrous fate, says Craig Savitzky at Leopard Solutions.

  • Preparing For DOJ's Data Analytics Push In FCPA Cases

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    After the U.S. Department of Justice’s recent announcement that it will leverage data analytics in Foreign Corrupt Practice Act investigations and prosecutions, companies will need to develop a compliance strategy that likewise implements data analytics to get ahead of enforcement risks, say attorneys at Cozen O'Connor.

  • Considering The Logical Extremes Of Your Legal Argument

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    Recent oral arguments in the federal election interference case against former President Donald Trump highlighted the age-old technique of extending an argument to its logical limit — a principle that is still important for attorneys to consider in preparing their cases, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

  • Storytelling Strategies To Defuse Courtroom Conspiracies

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    Misinformation continues to proliferate in all sectors of society, including in the courtroom, as jurors try to fill in the gaps of incomplete trial narratives — underscoring the need for attorneys to tell a complete, consistent and credible story before and during trial, says David Metz at IMS Legal Strategies.

  • Lessons From Rare Post-Verdict Healthcare Fraud Acquittal

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    A Maryland federal court recently overturned a jury verdict that found a doctor guilty of healthcare fraud related to billing levels for COVID-19 tests, providing defense attorneys with potential strategies for obtaining acquittals in similar prosecutions, says attorney Andrew Feldman.

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