Residential

  • March 21, 2024

    Nossaman Adds 2 Eminent Domain Partners In Texas

    Nossaman LLP announced Thursday that Seijin C. Brooks and Melissa Ferringer have joined the firm's Austin, Texas, office as partners in that shop's eminent domain and valuation group.

  • March 20, 2024

    Receiver Allowed To Have 'Evil Zombie' Standing In Fraud Suit

    The Eleventh Circuit revived a receiver's Florida lawsuit seeking to recover $22 million allegedly lost in a Ponzi scheme, saying he has standing to bring fraudulent transfer claims by several companies used in the fraud because they're no longer the "evil zombies" controlled by the perpetrators.

  • March 20, 2024

    Philly Charter School Exec Convicted Of Embezzlement

    A nonprofit executive was convicted Wednesday in Pennsylvania federal court on all 18 counts of siphoning funds from a tax-exempt educational and housing organization to live lavishly, while the same jury found a colleague guilty of conspiracy to commit fraud but absolved him of other charges.

  • March 20, 2024

    NY High Court Revives Suit Against NYC Property Taxes

    A lawsuit challenging the fairness of New York City's property tax system lives on, with New York's highest court finding a group's complaint sufficiently pleads causes of action against the city for violations of New York's Real Property Tax Law and the federal Fair Housing Act.

  • March 20, 2024

    Breaking Down Each State's Climate Priority Policies

    Forty-five states have now completed climate action plans outlining how they'll advance federal climate goals through policy and programs in coming years, with most focusing at least in part on real estate development as a way to reduce emissions.

  • March 20, 2024

    Re/Max GC Sees Light At The End Of Antitrust Tunnel

    Re/Max general counsel Susie Winders has spent several years in a joint defense group fighting antitrust cases brought by sellers over real estate commissions, and she says she is now "very pleased" over recent settlements despite their costs.

  • March 19, 2024

    Chicago Voters Nix Tiered Rates On Real Estate Transfer Tax

    Chicago voters rejected a contentious referendum Tuesday night that would have authorized the city to impose tiered real estate transfer tax rates including an increase for properties sold at $1 million and higher.

  • March 19, 2024

    Builder Confidence In New Construction Rises As Rates Fall

    Homebuilder confidence in the market for new single-family homes was net positive for the first time since July, as fewer and fewer builders are forced to cut home prices to combat high mortgage rates, according to a report from the National Association of Home Builders.

  • March 19, 2024

    Feds, Mich., City Escape Black Residents' $600M Pollution Case

    A Michigan federal judge has dismissed a $600 million lawsuit brought by Black residents of Kalamazoo claiming a local company, the city, the state and the federal government did nothing about polluted air in their neighborhood because of their race.

  • March 19, 2024

    NC Panel Rules Nonprofit Not Entitled To Tax Exemption

    A North Carolina manufactured home community doesn't qualify for a charitable tax exemption because providing land for housing units isn't considered equivalent to providing affordable housing for low-income individuals, the state appeals court ruled Tuesday.

  • March 19, 2024

    NAR Pitches Broker Fee Shakeup To Quiet Antitrust Scrutiny

    As soon as this summer, The National Association of Realtors could retire a long-standing system traditionally setting brokers fees at 6% of the cost of a home sale, in a change to escape mounting claims that the rules caused home sellers to pay more than their fair share.

  • March 19, 2024

    SEC Gambles Climate Rule Fate On Circuit Court Lottery

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission on Tuesday asked the U.S. Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation to consolidate legal challenges to its climate disclosure regulations before a single federal circuit court, leaving the fate of the hotly debated rules in the hands of a randomly selected appellate panel.

  • March 19, 2024

    Md. House OKs Special Tax Rates For Vacant Property

    Maryland would let the Baltimore city council and county governments in the state impose special tax rates on vacant or abandoned property under a bill passed by the House of Delegates.

  • March 19, 2024

    Conn. Supreme Court Snapshot: Housing Battles Heat Up

    The Connecticut Supreme Court in March is set to consider two cases that would clarify landlords' obligations to tenants and local governments when their buildings are ruined through wrongdoing.

  • March 19, 2024

    Fla. City Atty Says Law Grants Immunity In Realty Fraud Suit

    An attorney for the city of Miami told a state appellate panel Tuesday that the law entitles her to sovereign immunity in a lawsuit in which she's accused of aiding her husband in a real estate fraud scheme, saying the allegations aren't specific enough to remove that protection from her.

  • March 19, 2024

    Finance Co., Canadian Pension Board Unveil $750M Partnership

    California-based specialty finance company Redwood Trust Inc. and the Canada Pension Plan Investment Board unveiled a $750 million partnership that includes a $500 million asset joint venture and a $250 million two-year "corporate secured financing facility," according to a joint official announcement.

  • March 19, 2024

    Bradley Arant Adds Ex-Chamberlain Hrdlicka RE Team In Ga.

    Bradley Arant Boult Cummings LLP has strengthened its real estate practice in Atlanta with a four-attorney team from Chamberlain Hrdlicka White Williams & Aughtry.

  • March 19, 2024

    Colo. Panel OKs Expanding Historic Structure Tax Credit

    Colorado would expand its tax credit for preservation of historic structures, reducing the age requirement for the properties, postponing the sunset of the credit and making other changes under legislation passed by the state House panel.

  • March 19, 2024

    Md. House OKs Property Tax Credits For Residential Projects

    Local governments in Maryland would be authorized to grant property tax credits for certain hotel and residential developments that include affordable housing under legislation approved by the state House of Delegates.

  • March 18, 2024

    Philly Nonprofit Execs Lived Large On Co. Money, Jury Told

    Jurors should not believe arguments from two nonprofit executives who are former associates of City Councilman Kenyatta Johnson who said they simply made bookkeeping mistakes and didn't concoct an alleged scheme to spend company money on things like huge bonuses, lavish vacations and bribing a Milwaukee school official, federal prosecutors said Monday. 

  • March 18, 2024

    New York Allots $260M To Create, Preserve Affordable Homes

    New York Gov. Kathy Hochul announced Monday that the state has allocated $260 million in low-income housing tax credits and subsidies to create and preserve 1,852 affordable homes across every region of the state.

  • March 18, 2024

    Colo. HOA Not Covered In Travelers Repair Payment Row

    A Colorado federal judge ruled a Travelers unit doesn't have a duty to defend or indemnify a Denver homeowners association seeking coverage for a dispute with a different Travelers unit that alleged it overpaid for a hailstorm property damage claim.

  • March 18, 2024

    Battle Over Mass. Rezoning Law Headed To High Court In Fall

    The Massachusetts attorney general's lawsuit to force a Boston suburb to comply with an ambitious housing law was fast-tracked Monday to the state's high court later this year, as more than a hundred towns around Boston watch how the dispute plays out.

  • March 18, 2024

    Ore. Tax Court Rejects Valuation Corrections By County

    The Oregon Tax Court agreed with a residential property owner that a county assessor's corrections of a valuation due to errors were not valid, restoring the valuation to the property's real market value before the corrections.

  • March 18, 2024

    4 Times Federal Courts Confronted NY Split On Pay Frequency

    New York federal courts are confronting a choice of whether to greenlight lawsuits alleging workers haven't been paid weekly, as state law requires for those who perform manual work, now that a split regarding such cases' viability has arisen in state appeals courts. Here, Law360 explores four cases where federal courts have picked a side amid the split in authority.

Expert Analysis

  • Caregiver Flexibility Is Crucial For Atty Engagement, Retention

    Author Photo

    As the battle for top talent continues post-pandemic, many firms are attempting to attract employees with progressive hybrid working environments — and supporting caregivers before, during and after an extended leave is a critically important way to retain top talent, says Manar Morales at The Diversity & Flexibility Alliance.

  • AI Road Ahead Is Promising For Cautious Fintechs

    Author Photo

    Financial institutions should understand the conceptions and misconceptions about artificial intelligence likely to influence regulators, and proactively study potential adverse impacts and establish use case strategies and other guardrails for deploying AI, say attorneys at Jones Day.

  • In-Office Engagement Is Essential To Associate Development

    Author Photo

    As law firms develop return-to-office policies that allow hybrid work arrangements, they should incorporate the specific types of in-person engagement likely to help associates develop attributes common among successful firm leaders, says Liisa Thomas at Sheppard Mullin.

  • How To Recognize And Recover From Lawyer Loneliness

    Author Photo

    Law can be one of the loneliest professions, but there are practical steps that attorneys and their managers can take to help themselves and their peers improve their emotional health, strengthen their social bonds and protect their performance, says psychologist and attorney Traci Cipriano.

  • Why All Eyes Are On Florida's Affordable Housing Reform

    Author Photo

    Florida's Live Local Act, which took effect last month, promotes much-needed affordable housing developments with a mix of zoning preemption provisions and tax benefits that may attract interest from developers across the nation, say attorneys at Nelson Mullins.

  • What Came Of Texas Legislature's Long-Promised Tax Relief

    Author Photo

    Following promises of historic tax relief made possible by a record budget surplus, the Texas legislative session as a whole was one in which taxpayers that are large businesses could have done somewhat better, but the new legislation is clearly still a positive, say attorneys at Baker Botts.

  • Looking Behind The Curtain Of Residential Transition Loans

    Author Photo

    As residential transition loans and securitizations of such loans grow increasingly popular, real estate stakeholders should take care to understand both the unique features and potential challenges offered by this novel asset class, say attorneys at Mayer Brown.

  • Hedging Variable Interest Rates In A Volatile Market

    Author Photo

    Variable rate loans, which were an advantageous borrowing method prior to the recent Federal Reserve rate hikes and subsequent volatility, are now the difference between borrowers remaining current on their obligations and defaulting due to the sharply increasing debt service requirements of their loans, say attorneys at Cassin & Cassin.

  • Mallory Gives Plaintiffs A Better Shot At Justice

    Author Photo

    Critics of the U.S. Supreme Court's recent decision in Mallory v. Norfolk Southern claim it opens the door to litigation tourism, but the ruling simply gives plaintiffs more options — enabling them to seek justice against major corporations in the best possible court, say Rayna Kessler and Ethan Seidenberg at Robins Kaplan.

  • CRA Plays Role In DOJ Fight Against Redlining

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Department of Justice’s recent consent order with ESSA Bank & Trust is a reminder that although the Community Reinvestment Act lacks a civil enforcement provision, financial institutions' CRA compliance efforts may have ramifications under various anti-discrimination statutes, say Collin Grier and Levi Swank at Goodwin.

  • Colo. Eviction Case Could Transform Tenant Rights

    Author Photo

    The Colorado Supreme Court recently granted certiorari in a case that could open the door for tenants to assert allegations of discrimination and retaliation during eviction proceedings, and dramatically prolong the state's process, says Jacob Hollars at Spencer Fane.

  • Courts Can Overturn Deficient State Regulations, Too

    Author Photo

    While suits challenging federal regulations have become commonplace, such cases against state agencies are virtually nonexistent, but many states have provisions that allow litigants to bring suit for regulations with inadequate cost-benefit analyses, says Reeve Bull at the Virginia Office of Regulatory Management.

  • Harsh 11th Circ. Rebuke Should Inspire Changes At CFPB

    Author Photo

    The Eleventh Circuit's recent Consumer Financial Protection Bureau v. Brown decision, which found the CFPB's conduct had been egregious in a debt collection enforcement action, should encourage some reflection at the bureau regarding its level of attention to the reasonable due process concerns of regulated institutions, says Eric Mogilnicki at Covington.