Project Finance

  • February 29, 2024

    NY Tabs Equinor, Orsted Projects For Offshore Wind Deals

    New York officials on Thursday awarded power contracts to offshore wind projects being developed by Equinor and an Orsted-Eversource partnership, the first contracts awarded under a revised bidding process aimed at combating macroeconomic headwinds buffeting U.S. offshore wind development.

  • February 29, 2024

    GE Denies Ties To La. Environmental Contamination Suit

    General Electric told a Louisiana federal judge it should be freed from a lawsuit seeking to hold it liable for widespread environmental contamination caused by a since-closed pressure valve manufacturing facility in Rapides Parish, saying the property owners behind the suit are relying on a misguided theory of liability.

  • February 28, 2024

    Skeptical DC Circ. Probes Treaty's Arbitration Applicability

    A D.C. Circuit panel on Wednesday seemed dubious about efforts by Spain and Romania to escape the enforcement of substantial arbitration awards based on the contention that European Union law prohibits arbitration between member states and European investors.

  • February 28, 2024

    Judge Asks When Feds Will Consider Climate In Oil Leases

    A D.C. federal judge on Wednesday voiced frustration at the Bureau of Land Management's inability to account for the total impact of carbon emissions from six western oil and gas leases, but cautioned that previous circuit courts have upheld federal agencies' reluctance to block projects based on climate change predictions.

  • February 28, 2024

    Fla. Judge OKs $43.5M Deutsche Bank Deal In Ch. 15 Case

    A Florida bankruptcy judge on Wednesday approved a $43.5 million settlement between Deutsche Bank AG and liquidators for a group of Caribbean-based companies to resolve claims against the bank for its alleged role in a real estate Ponzi scheme targeting rich South Americans.

  • February 28, 2024

    Energy Dept. To Give Tribes $25M For Clean Energy Tech

    The U.S. Department of Energy has said it is paying out $25 million in funds to Indigenous tribes for clean energy technology on tribal lands as part of an approximately $366 million Biden administration plan to support community-driven energy projects in rural areas.

  • February 28, 2024

    FCC 'Amnesty' Sought For Rural Broadband Grant Defaults

    Broadband experts got together Wednesday to urge the Federal Communications Commission to offer "amnesty" for defaulting on FCC-funded rural network development projects, so that unserved areas can still receive similar grants being distributed by the U.S. Department of Commerce.

  • February 28, 2024

    Win For DC's NFL Stadium Bid As House Approves Bill

    A bill that would clear a path for the Washington, D.C., city government to build a new stadium for the NFL's Commanders on the site of the team's former stadium was passed by the full House on Wednesday and sent to the Senate, possibly paving the way for the team to return to the city.

  • February 28, 2024

    NC Biz Court Pares Feud Over Costly City Streetcar Expansion

    The North Carolina Business Court has narrowed a general contractor's $115 million lawsuit against the city of Charlotte stemming from a streetcar line construction project, saying the city isn't immune but that a swath of claims were otherwise filed too late.

  • February 28, 2024

    Energy Cos. Urge Justices To Slam Brakes On Climate Suits

    Fossil fuel companies on Wednesday launched a fresh U.S. Supreme Court bid to put an end to climate change torts lodged by state and local governments, asking the justices to review and overturn a refusal by Hawaii's top court to dismiss Honolulu's suit.

  • February 27, 2024

    SunZia Line Injunction Needed To Save Sites, Ariz. Tribes Say

    Two Native American tribes and conservation groups seeking to halt construction of a 550-mile power line have renewed their push for a preliminary injunction, arguing that without the order, important cultural and historical sites in the San Pedro Valley will be reduced to collateral damage.

  • February 27, 2024

    Commanders Unveil Stadium Upgrades Amid Possible Move

    The Washington Commanders on Tuesday announced a total of $75 million in upgrades to its current home stadium that includes new premium seating and a new sound system, amid a battle to determine where the NFL team will play in the future.

  • February 27, 2024

    5th Circ. Holds To Its Undoing Of $200M Ship Explosion Award

    A German shipping company has failed to persuade the Fifth Circuit to reconsider undoing a federal district court's decision to enforce a $200 million arbitral award the company secured in London after a 2012 explosion killed three crew members and caused extensive damage on one of its vessels.

  • February 27, 2024

    NH Power Plant Gets OK On Purchaser Settlement In Ch. 11

    Bankrupt New Hampshire power plant Burgess Biopower LLC will receive a $3.35 million payment from a power purchaser that allegedly withheld money it owed last year, reaching a settlement agreement between the parties that won a Delaware federal judge's blessing on Tuesday.

  • February 27, 2024

    States, Businesses Aim To Kill Feds' Revised Water Rule

    States and business groups have asked a North Dakota federal judge to force the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to revise regulations intended to define the scope of the federal government's authority under the Clean Water Act.

  • February 27, 2024

    Energy Co. Asks 8th Circ. To Revive Lease Termination Suit

    A Denver-based energy company has told the Eighth Circuit that a North Dakota federal judge was wrong to dismiss its lease termination suit and hold that it had not exhausted its administrative remedies when its appeal of the Bureau of Indian Affairs decision had dragged on for nine-plus years.

  • February 27, 2024

    Ga. Judge Pauses $300M Bond Deadline In Monkey Farm Fight

    A Georgia federal judge on Monday suspended an imminent deadline for a $300 million bond agreement to finance the construction of a controversial primate-rearing farm amid a series of court fights over whether local officials can legally back out of the deal.

  • February 27, 2024

    No Merit To Gas Pipeline Safety Rules Fight, Feds Say

    The U.S. Department of Transportation on Monday urged the D.C. Circuit to reject a gas pipeline industry group's challenge of a handful of new safety standards for transmission pipelines, saying it shouldn't be legally second-guessed over what amounts to a policy disagreement at the margins.

  • February 27, 2024

    New Fuel Terminals Ban Doesn't Discriminate, Judge Says

    An Oregon federal judge has recommended the dismissal of a lawsuit in which Montana and a collection of fuel industry groups are challenging a ban on new oil and gas terminals in Portland, Oregon, saying there's no evidence the ban unconstitutionally discriminates against out-of-state companies.

  • February 27, 2024

    Project Finance Group Of The Year: Winston & Strawn

    With an achievement list spanning an unusual private market community solar portfolio, financing the Las Vegas Sphere, toll roads and New York City subway connectivity, Winston & Strawn LLP has solidified a place on Law360's 2023 Practice Groups of the Year.

  • February 26, 2024

    Apache's $3B Write-Down Merits Bigger Class, Investors Say

    A group of Apache Corp. investors on the cusp of winning class certification are arguing that their promised class should be extended to encompass even more investors who were allegedly deceived by company promises of a potentially lucrative drilling project that ultimately led to a $3 billion write-down when it went bust. 

  • February 26, 2024

    Gas Groups Press DOE To Restart LNG Export Reviews

    Oil and gas industry groups on Monday urged the U.S. Department of Energy to lift its recent pause of approvals of liquefied natural gas exports to countries that don't have free-trade agreements with the United States, arguing that the move is illegal.

  • February 26, 2024

    FCC Tells Reps. Starlink RDOF Application Was Insufficient

    The Federal Communications Commission recently told members of Congress that the agency rejected satellite company Starlink's long-form application for about $885 million in rural broadband development subsidies because the company's plan indicated it had trouble meeting speed standards, among other reasons.

  • February 26, 2024

    Texas Justices Say $220M Cobalt Deal Is A Loss Under Policy

    A $220 million settlement that now-bankrupt Cobalt International Energy Inc. reached with a group of investors constitutes a loss under the energy company's insurance policies, but the agreement is not binding on Cobalt's insurers to establish coverage, the Texas Supreme Court ruled.

  • February 26, 2024

    Banks Say Brazil Pollution Suit In NY Is In Wrong Country

    Four leading financial institutions are urging a New York federal judge to throw out a pair of proposed class suits accusing them of enabling environmental degradation in Brazil by lending $17.2 million to Brazilian mining company Vale SA, arguing the claims don't belong in the United States because they are "all about Brazil."

Expert Analysis

  • 7 Common Myths About Lateral Partner Moves

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    As lateral recruiting remains a key factor for law firm growth, partners considering a lateral move should be aware of a few commonly held myths — some of which contain a kernel of truth, and some of which are flat out wrong, says Dave Maurer at Major Lindsey.

  • Proposed Hydrogen Tax Credit Regs May Be Legally Flawed

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    While the recently proposed regulations for the new clean hydrogen production tax credit have been lauded by some in the environmental community, it is unclear whether they are sufficiently grounded in law, result from valid rulemaking processes, or accord with other administrative law principles, say Hunter Johnston and Steven Dixon at Steptoe.

  • Series

    Cheering In The NFL Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Balancing my time between a BigLaw career and my role as an NFL cheerleader has taught me that pursuing your passions outside of work is not a distraction, but rather an opportunity to harness important skills that can positively affect how you approach work and view success in your career, says Rachel Schuster at Sheppard Mullin.

  • What Recent Setbacks In Court Mean For Enviro Justice

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    Two courts in Louisiana last month limited the federal government's ability to require consideration of Civil Rights Act disparate impacts when evaluating state-issued permits — likely providing a framework for opposition to environmental justice initiatives in other states, say attorneys at King & Spalding.

  • New Hydrogen Regulations Show The Need For IP Protections

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    The introduction of hydrogen regulations, such as the IRS' proposed tax credit for clean hydrogen under the Inflation Reduction Act, are reshaping the competitive landscape, with intellectual property rights an area of increased emphasis, say Evan Glass and James De Vellis at Foley & Lardner.

  • Series

    ESG Around The World: Gulf Cooperation Council

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    The Gulf Cooperation Council is in the early stages of ESG policy implementation, but recent commitments by both states and corporations — including increases in sustainable finance transactions, environmental commitments, female representation on boards and human rights enforcement — show continuing progress toward broader ESG goals, say attorneys at Cleary.

  • 6 Pointers For Attys To Build Trust, Credibility On Social Media

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    In an era of information overload, attorneys can use social media strategically — from making infographics to leveraging targeted advertising — to cut through the noise and establish a reputation among current and potential clients, says Marly Broudie at SocialEyes Communications.

  • A Post-Mortem Analysis Of Stroock's Demise

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    After the dissolution of 147-year-old firm Stroock late last year shook up the legal world, a post-mortem analysis of the data reveals a long list of warning signs preceding the firm’s collapse — and provides some insight into how other firms might avoid the same disastrous fate, says Craig Savitzky at Leopard Solutions.

  • Don't Sit On Bankruptcy Sidelines, 5th Circ. Ruling Reminds

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    The Fifth Circuit’s recent In re: Louisiana Pellets decision, holding that a creditor couldn’t assert indemnification defenses in a suit brought by the trustee of a liquidation trust, highlights the risks faced by creditors and other contract parties that choose not to participate in a bankruptcy, say Gregory Hesse and Kaleb Bailey at Hunton.

  • Challenges Remain In Financing Energy Transition Minerals

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    COP28, the latest U.N. climate conference, reached a consensus on a just and equitable transition from fossil fuels to renewable energy, but more action and funding will be needed to ensure that developed countries responsibly source the minerals that will be critical for this process, say attorneys at Watson Farley.

  • Series

    Coaching High School Wrestling Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Coaching my son’s high school wrestling team has been great fun, but it’s also demonstrated how a legal career can benefit from certain experiences, such as embracing the unknown, studying the rules and engaging with new people, says Richard Davis at Maynard Nexsen.

  • Opinion

    New La. Gas Pipeline Projects Must Respect Rules And Rights

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    As pipeline developers rush to join in Louisiana's Haynesville Shale gas boom, established operators like Energy Transfer are justified in demanding that newer entrants respect safety rules, regulatory requirements and property rights when proposing routes that would cross existing pipelines, says Joshua Campbell at Campbell Law.

  • SG's Office Is Case Study To Help Close Legal Gender Gap

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    As women continue to be underrepresented in the upper echelons of the legal profession, law firms could learn from the example set by the Office of the Solicitor General, where culture and workplace policies have helped foster greater gender equality, say attorneys at Ocean Tomo.

  • The Corporate Disclosure Tug-Of-War's Free Speech Issues

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    The continuing conflict over corporate disclosure requirements — highlighted by a lawsuit against Missouri's anti-ESG rules — has important implications not just for investors and regulated entities but also for broader questions about the scope of the First Amendment, say Colin Pohlman, and Jane Luxton and Paul Kisslinger at Lewis Brisbois.

  • Reimagining Law Firm Culture To Break The Cycle Of Burnout

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    While attorney burnout remains a perennial issue in the legal profession, shifting post-pandemic expectations mean that law firms must adapt their office cultures to retain talent, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

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