Pennsylvania

  • February 29, 2024

    NJ Towns Can't Sue Netflix, Hulu For Fees, 3rd Circ. Says

    Two New Jersey municipalities cannot sue Netflix and Hulu for franchise fees under the state's Cable Television Act, the Third Circuit held Thursday in a precedential opinion, saying the state statute reserves enforcement of the law to the state Board of Public Utilities.

  • February 29, 2024

    Bankrupt Endo To Pay $465M To Resolve Opioid Claims

    Drugmaker Endo International has agreed to pay as much as $465 million to resolve criminal and civil claims stemming from its sale and marketing of a powerful opioid, and will turn over its assets to a group of secured lenders who will operate the company under a new corporate structure.

  • February 28, 2024

    Elite Schools Get OK For $166M More Aid-Fixing Deals

    An Illinois federal judge handling student aid-fixing allegations against 17 top universities gave his initial blessing to another $166 million in settlements Wednesday, the day after he ordered three universities to produce documents that could show they handled certain students' admissions differently from others.

  • February 28, 2024

    Indivior's $385M Suboxone Antitrust Deal Gets Final OK

    A Pennsylvania federal judge has granted final approval to Indivior's $385 million settlement with direct purchasers in antitrust litigation over its opioid addiction treatment Suboxone and awarded roughly $120 million in attorney fees to the purchasers' counsel.

  • February 28, 2024

    Cravath Steers Viatris' $350M Collab With Swiss Co.

    Healthcare company Viatris and Swiss pharmaceutical research company Idorsia are teaming up to develop two late-stage drugs, the companies announced Wednesday.

  • February 28, 2024

    Embattled Philly Loan Biz Principals Hit With RICO Charges

    Legal troubles for the principals of Philadelphia's Par Funding cash advance company are mounting as federal prosecutors hit them with a new indictment adding Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act allegations on top of existing charges that the principals bilked investors out of hundreds of millions of dollars and threatened violence against borrowers.

  • February 28, 2024

    Michigan Atty, Trump Ally, In Default For Avoiding Pay Suit

    A default judgment was entered against a Michigan attorney known for pushing former President Donald Trump's unfounded voter fraud claims after a cybersecurity company said she didn't respond to 40 attempts to serve her with a lawsuit claiming that she didn't pay for voting machine inspections. 

  • February 28, 2024

    Insurance Agency Says It Wasn't Told Of Airbnb Shooting Suits

    A Pennsylvania insurance agency accused of concealing that a Pittsburgh Airbnb property was subject to numerous lawsuits over a mass shooting has claimed that the property owner never revealed the problems when shopping for a new policy, so it wasn't the agency's fault when the new insurer canceled coverage.

  • February 28, 2024

    AdaptHealth, Ex-CEO Cut $51M Deal To End Investor Fight

    AdaptHealth and its former CEO have agreed to pay $51 million to resolve a shareholder suit alleging the medical equipment company misled investors by retroactively inflating growth numbers ahead of a merger with special acquisition firm DFB Healthcare Acquisitions Corp., according to court documents filed in Pennsylvania federal court Tuesday.

  • February 28, 2024

    3rd Circ. Won't Rehear Pfizer Shareholder Suit Coverage Row

    Pfizer won't get a second shot at arguing its insurer should indemnify it in a settlement stemming from a 2003 shareholder class action, with the Third Circuit on Wednesday declining the pharmaceutical company's request for an en banc rehearing.

  • February 27, 2024

    'Delay' Adds $2.3M To Monsanto's $175M Roundup Judgment

    A Philadelphia judge on Tuesday added approximately $2.3 million in delay damages — a form of prejudgment interest — to a $175 million verdict against Bayer AG unit Monsanto in the case of a man who said using the weed killer Roundup caused him to develop cancer, also rejecting the company's request for a new trial.

  • February 27, 2024

    Firing Over Vax Refusal Was No 'Holy War,' Pa. Judge Rules

    A software developer who was fired under his company's COVID-19 vaccination policy can't claim religious discrimination because he hadn't shown that his vaccine refusal was tied to a larger system of religious belief, a Pennsylvania federal judge ruled Tuesday.

  • February 27, 2024

    Philly Gun Shop Ban Doesn't Flout 2nd Amendment

    Philadelphia's zoning code barring gun shops close to residential neighborhoods didn't violate a shooting range's Second Amendment rights, because the location of a shop isn't part of the fundamental rights covered by the amendment, a Pennsylvania appellate court ruled Tuesday.

  • February 27, 2024

    No Arbitration In Pa. Law Firm's Suit Against Web Developer

    The Pennsylvania Superior Court has ruled that a website design company's request for arbitration was properly denied in a law firm's breach of contract suit against it, reasoning that the company waived the right to arbitration by continuing to litigate the case.

  • February 27, 2024

    3rd Circ. Won't Reconsider Coverage Ruling For Deli Stabbing

    The Third Circuit declined to review its decision that an insurer for a Philadelphia deli does not owe coverage for a $900,000 settlement reached with a man stabbed on the premises.

  • February 27, 2024

    Biden's Labor Secretary Nom Clears Senate Committee Again

    Julie Su, President Joe Biden's long-running nominee for labor secretary who has been temporarily serving in the role for the past year, made it through a Senate committee Tuesday, though her fate in the full chamber is uncertain.

  • February 26, 2024

    3rd Circ. Backs Amtrak's Win In Fired Black Worker's Bias Suit

    The Third Circuit declined Monday to revive a Black former Amtrak inspector's racial discrimination suit claiming he was fired out of prejudice, ruling he didn't show bias informed the company's decision to sack him for taking hundreds of dollars in gifts from a contractor.

  • February 26, 2024

    Railcar Cos. Want Out Of Pa. Schools' Derailment Suit

    A trio of railcar companies told a federal court that a group of Pennsylvania school districts can't rope them into litigation over the Norfolk Southern derailment in East Palestine, Ohio, arguing in briefs Friday that the schools didn't sufficiently link them to the harm allegedly suffered from the derailment and chemical spill.

  • February 26, 2024

    Black Truck Drivers Can't Revive Race Bias Suit At 3rd Circ.

    Two Black truck drivers for a supermarket chain couldn't beat "voluminous evidence" that they were fired for threatening a co-worker who one called a "rat" or a "snitch," the Third Circuit ruled, refusing to revive their suit blaming race bias for their termination.

  • February 26, 2024

    Conn. Homeowners Say Toll Bros. Botched Senior Community

    A planned community hit construction firm Toll Brothers with a breach of contract suit in Connecticut state court, alleging 67 townhomes, six apartment buildings and a clubhouse were built or improved with dozens of major defects the builder failed to fix.

  • February 26, 2024

    Ashurst, Davis Polk-Led Alcoa To Buy Alumina In $2.2B Deal

    Ashurst LLP and Davis Polk & Wardwell LLP are guiding Pittsburgh-based Alcoa on a preliminary agreement to buy Australia's Alumina Ltd. at an implied equity value of about $2.2 billion, in a deal confirmed by Alumina on Monday.

  • February 26, 2024

    Justices Pass On Venue Fight In Erie Indemnity Fees Suit

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday declined to review the Third Circuit's refusal to transfer a case challenging Erie Indemnity Co. management fees from state court back to federal court, preserving the lower court's precedential ruling that the matter does not qualify as a class action under the Class Action Fairness Act.

  • February 23, 2024

    BofA Seeks Win In Pa. Vehicle Repossession Class Action

    Bank of America NA has asked a Pennsylvania federal judge to grant it a win in a suit alleging it sent inadequate notice letters to people whose cars it repossessed, arguing that because the car owners admit the notices did not affect their ability to redeem their vehicles, there is no genuine issue in the case.

  • February 23, 2024

    Industrial Supplier Inks $350M Deal To Buy Wesco Unit

    Electrical distribution services company Wesco International has agreed to sell its North American and European industrial maintenance, repair and integrated supply business Wesco Integrated Supply to Vallen Distribution for $350 million in an attempt to reduce debt and repurchase shares, the companies announced Friday.

  • February 23, 2024

    'Empire' Star Owes Income Tax After Threatening DOJ Atty

    "Empire" actor Terrence Howard owes more than $900,000 in federal income taxes under a default judgment by a Pennsylvania federal judge that follows a monthslong search by the government to notify the actor of the suit, during which he threatened a government attorney.

Expert Analysis

  • 7 Common Myths About Lateral Partner Moves

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    As lateral recruiting remains a key factor for law firm growth, partners considering a lateral move should be aware of a few commonly held myths — some of which contain a kernel of truth, and some of which are flat out wrong, says Dave Maurer at Major Lindsey.

  • 2 Emerging Defenses For Website Tracking Class Actions

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    Putative class actions premised on state wiretapping statutes that bar website activity tracking continue to be on the rise, but they are increasingly being dismissed on two procedural grounds, says Sheri Pan at ZwillGen.

  • Series

    Cheering In The NFL Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Balancing my time between a BigLaw career and my role as an NFL cheerleader has taught me that pursuing your passions outside of work is not a distraction, but rather an opportunity to harness important skills that can positively affect how you approach work and view success in your career, says Rachel Schuster at Sheppard Mullin.

  • 6 Pointers For Attys To Build Trust, Credibility On Social Media

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    In an era of information overload, attorneys can use social media strategically — from making infographics to leveraging targeted advertising — to cut through the noise and establish a reputation among current and potential clients, says Marly Broudie at SocialEyes Communications.

  • Justices Stay The Course In Maritime Choice-Of-Law Ruling

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's narrowly drawn decision in Great Lakes Insurance v. Raiders Retreat Realty, enforcing the underlying insurance contract's choice-of-law provision, carefully distinguishes those provisions from forum selection clauses, and ensures that courts will not apply its precepts outside the maritime context, says John Coyle at the University of North Carolina.

  • 5 Lessons For SaaS Companies After Blackbaud Data Breach

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    Looking at the enforcement actions that software-as-a-service provider Blackbaud resolved with state attorneys general, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and the Federal Trade Commission in the past year can help SaaS companies manage these increasingly common forms of data breaches, say attorneys at Orrick.

  • A Refresher On Witness Testimony In 3 Key Settings

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    The recent controversy over congressional testimony from university presidents about antisemitism on campus serves as a reminder to attorneys about what to emphasize and avoid when preparing witnesses to testify before Congress, and how this venue differs from grand jury and trial proceedings, say Jack Sharman and Tyler Yarbrough at Lightfoot Franklin.

  • A Post-Mortem Analysis Of Stroock's Demise

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    After the dissolution of 147-year-old firm Stroock late last year shook up the legal world, a post-mortem analysis of the data reveals a long list of warning signs preceding the firm’s collapse — and provides some insight into how other firms might avoid the same disastrous fate, says Craig Savitzky at Leopard Solutions.

  • Preparing For DOJ's Data Analytics Push In FCPA Cases

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    After the U.S. Department of Justice’s recent announcement that it will leverage data analytics in Foreign Corrupt Practice Act investigations and prosecutions, companies will need to develop a compliance strategy that likewise implements data analytics to get ahead of enforcement risks, say attorneys at Cozen O'Connor.

  • 2nd Circ. Ruling Will Guide Social Media Account Ownership

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    The Second Circuit’s recent decision in JLM Couture v. Gutman — which held that ownership of social media accounts must be resolved using traditional property law analysis — will guide employers and employees alike in future cases, and underscores the importance of express agreements in establishing ownership of social media accounts, says Joshua Glasgow at Phillips Lytle.

  • 3 Principles For Minimizing The Risk Of A Nuclear Verdict

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    In one of the latest examples of so-called nuclear verdicts, a single plaintiff was awarded $2.25 billion in a jury trial against Monsanto — revealing the need for defense attorneys to prioritize trust, connection and simplicity when communicating with modern juries, say Jenny Hergenrother and Mia Falzarano at Alston & Bird.

  • Series

    Coaching High School Wrestling Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Coaching my son’s high school wrestling team has been great fun, but it’s also demonstrated how a legal career can benefit from certain experiences, such as embracing the unknown, studying the rules and engaging with new people, says Richard Davis at Maynard Nexsen.

  • SG's Office Is Case Study To Help Close Legal Gender Gap

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    As women continue to be underrepresented in the upper echelons of the legal profession, law firms could learn from the example set by the Office of the Solicitor General, where culture and workplace policies have helped foster greater gender equality, say attorneys at Ocean Tomo.

  • Employer Trial Tips For Fighting Worker PPE Pay Claims

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    Courts have struggled for decades to reach consensus on whether employees must be paid for time spent donning and doffing personal protective equipment, but this convoluted legal history points to practical trial strategies to help employers defeat these Fair Labor Standards Act claims, say Michael Mueller and Evangeline Paschal at Hunton.

  • Reimagining Law Firm Culture To Break The Cycle Of Burnout

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    While attorney burnout remains a perennial issue in the legal profession, shifting post-pandemic expectations mean that law firms must adapt their office cultures to retain talent, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

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