Michigan

  • March 11, 2024

    Injured Bus Rider Gave Up Right To Sue, Mich. Justices Told

    A Detroit public transit authority told the Michigan Supreme Court to affirm that an injured passenger can't pursue the authority for personal injury protection benefits under the state's no-fault law after assigning her right to the benefits to her medical providers.

  • March 11, 2024

    Most Claims Trimmed In Ford Faulty Transmission Suit

    A Massachusetts federal judge has thrown out the bulk of a suit alleging Ford Motor Co. knowingly sold vehicles with a faulty transmission system, while allowing breach of implied warranty, fraudulent concealment and state law claims to proceed.

  • March 11, 2024

    New Detroit Voting Map Protects Incumbents, Voters Say

    Black voters are asking a Michigan federal court to reject a proposed replacement map for Detroit's voting districts drafted after the current map was ruled unconstitutional, slamming the proposal as an "incumbent protection plan" pushed by a political operative.

  • March 11, 2024

    12 Attys Depart Plunkett Cooney For Own Firm

    A dozen Plunkett Cooney PC attorneys based in Michigan have broken away to create their own firm focused on auto insurance liability defense.

  • March 11, 2024

    Mich. Justices Tell Panel To Revisit 'Robotic' Tax Ruling

    A Michigan appellate panel must reconsider its decision to uphold the denial of a man's principal-residence tax exemption under the Michigan Supreme Court's order to gather more information about the evidence the tax tribunal considered, revisiting a decision one appellate judge labeled "robotic acceptance" of the government's evidence.

  • March 08, 2024

    Mich. Court Can't Shush Library Whistleblower, Panel Says

    A Michigan appeals court has revived a former library director's whistleblower suit alleging she was fired for questioning whether the library could use public funds to pay for a board member's godson to open a restaurant on the premises, saying she reported ongoing conduct which is considered protected activity.

  • March 08, 2024

    Debt-Stricken Homeowners Fight Back After High Court Ruling

    Ten months after a landmark U.S. Supreme Court decision finding a Minnesota county wrongly held onto excess proceeds it reaped after seizing a woman’s condominium and selling it to settle a tax debt, states are scrambling to reexamine their laws as financially distressed homeowners file new suits challenging the practice.

  • March 08, 2024

    Detroit-Area Bars' Challenge To Parking Plan Gets Bounced

    A Michigan federal judge has trimmed a group of restaurants and bars' challenge to a Detroit suburb's plans to replace a parking lot their customers use with a mixed-use building, finding the eateries' financial success isn't protected under federal law.

  • March 08, 2024

    Mich. Justices Punt On Time Limits For Ballot Petition Drives

    The Michigan Supreme Court on Friday rejected an appeal from fracking opponents whose proposed ban didn't make the ballot because many gathered signatures were too old, though one justice said the court should have ruled on whether those time limits pass muster.

  • March 07, 2024

    Mich. Atty Faces Arrest After Skipping Vote Tamper Hearing

    A Michigan attorney accused of tampering with voting machines after the 2020 election must turn herself in by the end of the day Friday or risk being arrested after failing to show up for a hearing in her criminal case Thursday.

  • March 07, 2024

    Mich. Income Tax Cut Was Temporary, Appeals Court Rules

    A cut to Michigan's income tax rate in 2023 was only in effect for one year, a Michigan appeals court said Thursday, rejecting the position of state lawmakers and business groups that wanted the reduced rate to become the new default. 

  • March 07, 2024

    Mich. GOP Drops HQ Real Estate Fight Under New Leader

    The Michigan Republican Party has ended a lawsuit disputing ownership of its Lansing headquarters shortly after a new chair took the reins last week.   

  • March 07, 2024

    Senate Tees Up 5 More Judge Picks Despite GOP Resistance

    The Senate Judiciary Committee voted out five judicial nominees on Thursday, which includes various historic firsts for diversity.

  • March 07, 2024

    Mich. Bar Tells Attys To Store Property Only When Legal

    Michigan attorneys should be careful when deciding to store client property to ensure it's both legal and relevant to ongoing proceedings, according to the latest ethics guidance produced by the State Bar of Michigan's Judicial Ethics Committee.

  • March 07, 2024

    Honigman Hires New Real Estate Partner For Detroit Office

    Honigman LLP hired Corey Levin as a partner for its real estate practice in Detroit, gaining an attorney with experience in getting business and tax incentives for clients while working at accounting firm Ernst & Young.

  • March 06, 2024

    Meta Must Tackle Increased Account Hijackings, 41 AGs Say

    A bipartisan group of 41 attorneys general have urged Meta Platforms Inc. to tackle the "dramatic" increase in hackers taking over Facebook and Instagram accounts, saying the attacks have caused financial harm to victims and their families and friends.

  • March 06, 2024

    6th Circ. Orders Do-Over For Insurer's $3.3M Recoupment Row

    A Sixth Circuit panel on Tuesday revived a Chubb unit's bid to recoup costs from two other insurers after it helped windshield repair company Safelite pay for its defense against a competitor's suit, saying the lower court must conduct an analysis to determine whether the other carriers were prejudiced by late notice.

  • March 06, 2024

    Antisemitism Org. Slams Ex-Hockey Player's Defamation Suit

    An antisemitism watchdog group has said it should not have to face a former University of Michigan hockey player's defamation suit for calling him antisemitic after the student was caught spray-painting offensive graffiti in front of the campus' Jewish cultural center, arguing the group's speech is protected by the First Amendment.

  • March 06, 2024

    Sports Illustrated Betting Platform To Be Shut Down

    The turmoil at Sports Illustrated continued Wednesday as its partner 888 Holdings PLC announced that it was terminating its sportsbook agreement with the brand's parent company, saying the scale of operating costs in the United States has made the venture untenable.

  • March 06, 2024

    Mich. Judges Skeptical Taking Photos Is Eavesdropping

    A Michigan appellate judge said on Wednesday that he was hesitant to interpret a decades-old eavesdropping statute to say that taking a photograph is the same as overhearing a conversation, in a union leader's attempt to go after a rival union for snapping a picture during his deposition. 

  • March 06, 2024

    Mich. Lawmakers Take Up Trial Court Funding Reforms

    Michigan lawmakers are considering legislation that would set in motion reforms to a major source of funding for the state's trial courts: fees imposed on criminal defendants.

  • March 05, 2024

    Court Has No Cause To Deny Casino Land Request, Tribe Says

    A Michigan tribe urged the D.C. Circuit to reverse a lower court's ruling blocking it from acquiring land for two casino developments, arguing there's no dispute it bought the land to generate gaming revenue and that the Supreme Court and Congress have recognized its endeavor.

  • March 05, 2024

    Pharmacist Takes Deal In Mich. Over Fatal Meningitis Outbreak

    The founder of a Massachusetts drug compounding center that was the source of a deadly meningitis outbreak has pled no contest to 11 counts of manslaughter brought by Michigan state prosecutors, the latter state's Department of Attorney General announced Tuesday.

  • March 05, 2024

    Security Co. Off The Hook For Guard Dozing During Auto Theft

    A Michigan state judge threw out a logistics company's suit accusing a contracted security guard of dozing off while eight of its vehicles were stolen, ruling the company never specified what exactly it wanted guards to do on the clock.

  • March 05, 2024

    Mich. Appeals Court Speeds Up Ford Battery Factory Dispute

    A Michigan appeals judge agreed Tuesday to fast-track a case brought by opponents of a planned $3.5 billion Ford battery plant who want to put a ballot question to voters in the next election.

Expert Analysis

  • Identifying Trends And Tips In Litigation Financing Disclosure

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    Growing interest and controversy in litigation financing raise several salient concerns, but exploring recent compelled disclosure trends from courts around the country can help practitioners further their clients' interests, say Sean Callagy and Samuel Sokolsky at Arnold & Porter.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge Elrod On 'Jury Duty'

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    Though the mockumentary series “Jury Duty” features purposely outrageous characters, it offers a solemn lesson about the simple but brilliant design of the right to trial by jury, with an unwitting protagonist who even John Adams may have welcomed as an impartial foreperson, says Fifth Circuit Judge Jennifer Elrod.

  • 4 Business-Building Strategies For Introvert Attorneys

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Introverted lawyers can build client bases to rival their extroverted peers’ by adapting time-tested strategies for business development that can work for any personality — such as claiming a niche, networking for maximum impact, drawing on existing contacts and more, says Ronald Levine at Herrick Feinstein.

  • Opinion

    3 Ways Justices' Disclosure Defenses Miss The Ethical Point

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    The rule-bound interpretation of financial disclosures preferred by U.S. Supreme Court Justices Samuel Alito and Clarence Thomas — demonstrated in their respective statements defending their failure to disclose gifts from billionaires — show that they do not understand the ethical aspects of the public's concern, says Jim Moliterno at the Washington and Lee University School of Law.

  • Pending 6th Circ. Ruling Has Broad Class Action Implications

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    If the Sixth Circuit decides in FirstEnergy Corp. Securities Litigation to treat alleged half-truths as omissions for the purposes of class certification, public companies would be exposed to near-automatic class certification in nearly every securities case and would face steeper evidentiary hurdles at the merits stages, say attorneys at Willkie.

  • Rethinking Mich. Slip-And-Fall Defense After Top Court Ruling

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    The Michigan Supreme Court recently overturned three decades of premises liability jurisprudence by ruling that the open and obvious danger defense is no longer part of a traditional duty analysis, posing the question of whether landowners will ever again win on a motion for summary dismissal, say John Stiglich and Meriam Choulagh at Wilson Elser.

  • What Courts' Deference Preference Can Mean For Sentencing

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    The Fifth Circuit’s recent U.S. v. Vargas decision deepens the split among federal appeals courts on the level of deference afforded to commentary in the U.S. sentencing guidelines — an issue that has major real-life ramifications for defendants, and is likely bound for the U.S. Supreme Court, say Jennifer Freel and Michael Murtha at Jackson Walker.

  • Caregiver Flexibility Is Crucial For Atty Engagement, Retention

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    As the battle for top talent continues post-pandemic, many firms are attempting to attract employees with progressive hybrid working environments — and supporting caregivers before, during and after an extended leave is a critically important way to retain top talent, says Manar Morales at The Diversity & Flexibility Alliance.

  • What To Watch As Justices Take Up Title VII Job Transfer Case

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    With its recent decision to hear Muldrow v. City of St. Louis, the U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to decide whether an involuntary job transfer can count as employment discrimination under Title VII — an eventual ruling that has potential to reshape workplace bias claims nationwide, says Adam Grogan at Bell Law Group.

  • Strategies To Help Clients When BOP Ignores Medical Needs

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    Defense attorneys should cite recent case law and the expanded compassionate release guidelines, effective Nov. 1, when making any post-sentence application to aid incarcerated clients whose medical needs have been neglected by the Federal Bureau of Prisons, says Marissa Kingman at Fox Rothschild.

  • In-Office Engagement Is Essential To Associate Development

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    As law firms develop return-to-office policies that allow hybrid work arrangements, they should incorporate the specific types of in-person engagement likely to help associates develop attributes common among successful firm leaders, says Liisa Thomas at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Perspectives

    A Judge's Pitch To Revive The Jury Trial

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    Ohio state Judge Pierre Bergeron explains how the decline of the jury trial threatens public confidence in the judiciary and even democracy as a whole, and he offers ideas to restore this sacred right.

  • How To Recognize And Recover From Lawyer Loneliness

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    Law can be one of the loneliest professions, but there are practical steps that attorneys and their managers can take to help themselves and their peers improve their emotional health, strengthen their social bonds and protect their performance, says psychologist and attorney Traci Cipriano.

  • Opinion

    Litigation Funding Disclosure Should Be Mandatory

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    Despite the Appellate Rules Committee's recent deferral of the issue of requiring third-party litigation funding disclosure, such a mandate is necessary to ensure the even-handed administration of justice across all cases, says David Levitt at Hinshaw.

  • Recalling USWNT's Legal PR Playbook Amid World Cup Bid

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    As the U.S. Women's National Soccer Team strives to take home another World Cup trophy, their 2022 pay equity settlement with the U.S. Soccer Federation serves as a good reminder that winning in the court of public opinion can be more powerful than a victory inside the courtroom, says Hector Valle at Vianovo.

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