More Healthcare Coverage

  • February 27, 2024

    Conn. Agency Asks Judge To Rethink Tuition Refund Pause

    The Connecticut Office of Higher Education has asked a state judge to vacate a ruling that paused the agency's refund process for students affected by the abrupt shutdown of Stone Academy, arguing the judge shouldn't have exercised jurisdiction over the matter and that the ruling interferes with the agency's statutory authority to implement the program.

  • February 27, 2024

    Troubled REIT Finds Lifeline In $941M Bond Offering

    Diversified Healthcare Trust, which doubted its ability to survive mounting debt issues last year, no longer faces an existential threat due to proceeds it netted from a $941 million senior secured notes offering, an executive of the real estate investment trust said.

  • February 26, 2024

    Sales Reps Score $1.6M In Fees After Beating RICO Case

    A federal judge in Los Angeles has ordered a biotech startup to pay more than $1.6 million in legal fees to two former employees, after the company failed to convince a jury that the pair broke racketeering laws when they worked for a rival that stole proprietary information when setting up shop.

  • February 26, 2024

    Medical Device Companies Settle Ga. Wrongful Death Suit

    Two medical alert device companies have settled a Georgia man's allegations that their negligent handling of his mother's distress call led to her death, avoiding a looming trial in the case, according to a filing Monday in Peach State federal court.

  • February 26, 2024

    NJ Town Justified Hospital-Only Zone, Appeals Panel Says

    A New Jersey municipality may be able to exclude nursing homes from an area zoned for hospitals, a Garden State appeals panel ruled Monday, reasoning that a trial court order disallowing the maneuver relied on case law that's factually distinct. 

  • February 23, 2024

    Pa. Dentist Hit With $11M Verdict In Cancer Patient's Suit

    A Pennsylvania jury has awarded an $11 million verdict to a woman who claimed her dentist failed to promptly send her for a biopsy of a sore in her mouth that eventually developed into Stage IV cancer, her attorneys announced Friday.

  • February 22, 2024

    Conn. AG Defends $10M Remedy Bid Against Nursing School

    The state of Connecticut on Thursday defended its request to collect a $10 million litigation placeholder from a shuttered nursing school, arguing state regulators were correct to take action against the troubled institution despite the school's strenuous assertions that the attorney general's office is wrong on many facts.

  • February 22, 2024

    3rd Circ. Won't Protect AbbVie's Atty-Client Communications

    The Third Circuit has denied AbbVie Inc.'s bid to block a Pennsylvania federal court's order to turn over attorney communications from a patent case allegedly cooked up just to extend the company's monopoly on a testosterone drug, but the appellate court's explanation remained under seal Thursday.

  • February 22, 2024

    Total Vision's Antitrust Suit Against VSP Kept Largely Intact

    Total Vision can move forward with most antitrust claims accusing eye care insurance giant VSP of hamstringing it and trying to force an acquisition at a dramatically reduced price, after a California federal judge said VSP cannot summarily duck behind a deal signing away Total Vision's rights to sue.

  • February 22, 2024

    Fired Exec Says Conn. Hospital Booted Her For Her Age

    A former Waterbury Hospital executive is suing her ex-employer in Connecticut federal court, saying it posted her job on a career site while she was on medical leave and then fired her so the CEO could "replace her with someone younger and more attractive."

  • February 22, 2024

    Fla. Whistleblower Suit Deal Averts Littler's Disqualification

    Littler Mendelson PC won't have to face a disqualification bid in Florida federal court over a firm attorney's purported use of a mistakenly produced, privileged document at a deposition after its client reached a settlement in a whistleblower retaliation suit, court records show.

  • February 22, 2024

    ICE's Immunity Bars Bulk Of Virus Death Suit, For Now

    U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement has for now dodged most of a lawsuit over the death of a man who contracted COVID-19 in detention, after a California federal court ruled that sovereign immunity barred most of the case.

  • February 21, 2024

    Doc Keeps Trial Win In Suit Over Patient's Medication List

    A New York state appeals panel on Wednesday declined to grant a new trial to a widow who alleged her husband's doctor failed to tell his surgeon about his essential medications, saying the trial court did not allow the doctor to impermissibly pass the blame to defendants who'd already been dismissed from the case.

  • February 21, 2024

    Morgue Manager's Wife Cops To Role In Body Part Sales

    The wife of a Harvard University morgue manager will cop to interstate transport of stolen goods for her role in the alleged scheme to steal and sell human remains to a nationwide network, prosecutors said Wednesday.

  • February 21, 2024

    'Loser Pays' Arbitration Pact Spurs Age Bias Case's Revival

    An Ohio state appeals court revived a fired orthodontist's age bias suit claiming she was sacked after complaining that a younger colleague harassed her, ruling that a trial court was too quick to kick the case to arbitration in light of the contract's potentially problematic "loser pays" clause.

  • February 21, 2024

    Conn. Court Pauses Refund Plan For Ex-Nursing Students

    Over the objections of the Connecticut attorney general, a judge has temporarily halted a state agency's plan to refund some tuition money that students paid to the now-shuttered nursing school Stone Academy, siding with a proposed class of affected students who want to avoid waiving their legal rights in order to receive the payments.

  • February 21, 2024

    Juror Misconduct Warrants New Trial In Birth Injury Suit

    A Tennessee appeals panel has revived a woman's claims that her obstetrician caused birth injuries to her newborn by failing to administer an EpiPen when she had an allergic reaction to a medication, saying a juror likely polluted the verdict by bringing in outside information to deliberations.

  • February 20, 2024

    Ill. Cardiologist Keeps Trial Win In Med Mal Death Suit

    An Illinois state appeals court on Tuesday declined to upend a trial victory for a cardiologist and his employer in a suit alleging he misdiagnosed the severity of a heart condition in a patient who later died, saying the trial court was not wrong to allow certain defense testimony or limit the plaintiff's evidence.

  • February 20, 2024

    Permanent Need Dooms Request For H-2B Home Health Aides

    A U.S. Department of Labor appeals board has upheld the rejection of a business's request to hire four home health aides under the H-2B temporary foreign worker program, determining a certifying officer did not act arbitrarily and capriciously in finding the company failed to show its need for workers was temporary.

  • February 20, 2024

    Justices Decline Malpractice Dispute Over $6M Settlement

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday declined to hear the appeal of a Massachusetts legal malpractice suit in which Lubin & Meyer PC was accused, and cleared by a lower court, of pressuring a family into accepting a $6 million settlement that the family claims could have been higher.

  • February 16, 2024

    Judge Seeks Briefing On New Expert Proposed In Tylenol MDL

    U.S. District Judge Denise Cote signaled Friday that she's willing to consider a new expert witness proposed in the multidistrict litigation alleging prenatal exposure to acetaminophen causes ADHD, directing the parties to propose a briefing schedule on whether the expert's opinion is admissible.

  • February 16, 2024

    Family Of 23-Year-Old Who Died From Ulcer Gets $30M

    A Florida state jury awarded $30 million to the family of a 23-year-old woman who died from an untreated ulcer at a Tampa hospital after finding the two doctors entrusted with her care liable for negligence.

  • February 16, 2024

    Va. Couple Sues CooperSurgical Over Destroyed Embryos

    CooperSurgical Inc. has been hit with a product liability action in California federal court by a Virginia couple alleging they went through the arduous process of in vitro fertilization only for the company's defective culture media to destroy their irreplaceable embryos.

  • February 16, 2024

    Fired Hospital Worker Can't Keep Fighting PTO Denial

    A maintenance worker who lost an administrative case alleging his ex-employer owed him money for unused paid time off when he was fired cannot try again to get a judgment in state court against the hospital where he worked or Michigan labor regulators, an appellate panel has found.

  • February 16, 2024

    Littler Hit With DQ Bid For Wielding Mistakenly Produced Doc

    Littler Mendelson PC has gained an "unfair advantage" and should be booted from defending a Florida pharmacy services company for using an inadvertently produced, privileged document in a deposition last week, a woman suing the company for whistleblower retaliation said.

Expert Analysis

  • Health Staffing Shortages May Draw More Antitrust Scrutiny

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    Though courts have been historically hesitant to police hospital staffing under antitrust laws, recent staffing shortages in the health care industry have created a stronger need to preserve competition in the market and will likely result in crackdown efforts from courts, say Dylan Newton and Michael Horn at Archer & Greiner.

  • State Laws Could Complicate Employer Pandemic Protocols

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    If the recent wave of state bills that would prevent employers from implementing certain safety protocols in a future pandemic is signed into law, companies — especially those that operate across state lines — will be forced to completely rewrite their pandemic playbooks to avoid compliance issues and discrimination claims, says Karla Grossenbacher at Seyfarth Shaw.

  • How Telemedicine Providers Can Adapt To Post-COVID Rules

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    Telemedicine providers should pay close attention to the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration's temporary rule extending pandemic-era flexibilities for prescribing controlled substances and utilize this brief reprieve to prepare for significant changes in the final permanent rules to come, say Chris Eades and Mayo Alao at Hall Render.

  • A Watershed Moment For Microbiome-Based Therapy

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    While there has been limited microbiome patent enforcement so far, the regulatory approvals of three microbiome-related products and the case of Ferring v. Finch indicate that microbiome patent litigation could take off, and may spur greater investment in this space, say Mark FitzGerald and Alissa Young at Nixon Peabody.

  • Legal Pitfalls To Watch For When Advertising Psychedelics

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    As psychedelic products and related therapeutic services make their way into the mainstream, companies engaged in creating or publishing ads for such products and services should consider several legal implications on federal, state and local levels, says Dorian Thomas at Frankfurt Kurnit.

  • ERISA Ruling Shows Why Insurers Must Justify Claim Denials

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    The Tenth Circuit's recent decision in D.K. v. United Behavioral Health imposed a long-overdue measure of accountability on health insurers by holding that Employee Retirement Income Security Act compliance requires responding to the medical opinions of the beneficiary's treating doctors before denying claims, says Mark DeBofsky at DeBofsky Law.

  • USDA Salmonella Proposal Propels New Food Safety Journey

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    The U.S. Department of Agriculture's recent proposed policy to declare salmonella an adulterant in breaded stuffed raw chicken products could have major implications not only for the specialized products at issue, but also the entire poultry industry and beyond, say Bob Hibbert and Amaru Sanchez at Wiley.

  • What The Justices' Questions Signify For FCA Compliance

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    Whatever the outcome of two False Claims Act cases pending before the U.S. Supreme Court, the justices' questions during recent oral arguments indicate that government contractors should take certain steps to ensure their compliance programs are demonstrably active and adaptable, say Holly Butler and Rebecca Fallk at Miles & Stockbridge.

  • What Texas Misrepresentation Ruling Means For Insurers

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    The Texas Supreme Court's recent decision in American National Insurance v. Arce, confirming that insurers must prove intent to deceive in order to rescind coverage based on material misrepresentation, solidifies additional burdens for insurers to consider during both the underwriting and claims adjudication processes, say Josh Pedelty and Javon Johnson at Husch Blackwell.

  • What FTC's Data Actions Say About Tracker Enforcement

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    The Federal Trade Commission’s recent enforcement actions against GoodRx and BetterHelp for sharing sensitive user information show the agency may be setting a new standard for the collection, use and disclosure of user data, which should prompt companies to audit their use of — and policies regarding — data trackers, says Reed Freeman at ArentFox Schiff.

  • Labor Collusion Loss Will Shape DOJ's Case Strategy

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    Following the U.S. Department of Justice’s recent loss in United States v. Manahe, tallying its trial score record to 0-3 in labor-related antitrust cases over the past year, defendants can expect that the DOJ will try to exclude defense evidence and argue for more favorable jury instructions, say attorneys at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Examining Chancery's Recent Openness To Caremark Claims

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    As seen in an April decision involving Walmart's role in the national opioid epidemic, the Delaware Chancery Court has recently shown receptivity to Caremark claims at the early pleading stage of litigation, providing plaintiffs with more leverage to negotiate an early settlement and bringing risk management lessons for boards, say attorneys at Fried Frank.

  • Expect The Patchwork Of AI Regulation To Grow

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    Given the unlikelihood of meaningful federal artificial intelligence legislation in the immediate future, the patchwork of state AI regulation will likely continue to grow, bringing at least two main risks for companies in the AI space, say attorneys at Jenner & Block.

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