Construction

  • February 29, 2024

    NC Judge Trims Family Paving Co.'s Dueling Self-Dealing Jabs

    The North Carolina Business Court has pruned a family quarrel over the alleged mismanagement of their construction company, narrowing one side's claims that a longtime officer siphoned company funds for his own gain while simultaneously slashing certain counterclaims accusing a faction of the family of plotting a takeover.

  • February 28, 2024

    Skeptical DC Circ. Probes Treaty's Arbitration Applicability

    A D.C. Circuit panel on Wednesday seemed dubious about efforts by Spain and Romania to escape the enforcement of substantial arbitration awards based on the contention that European Union law prohibits arbitration between member states and European investors.

  • February 28, 2024

    Fla. Judge OKs $43.5M Deutsche Bank Deal In Ch. 15 Case

    A Florida bankruptcy judge on Wednesday approved a $43.5 million settlement between Deutsche Bank AG and liquidators for a group of Caribbean-based companies to resolve claims against the bank for its alleged role in a real estate Ponzi scheme targeting rich South Americans.

  • February 28, 2024

    Rochester Loses Telecom Fee Bench Trial Over Hearsay

    Verizon Communications and Crown Castle Fiber have won their fight with Rochester, New York, over how much the city can charge telecoms to do business after the New York federal judge overseeing the case declared the city's cost spreadsheet to be hearsay. 

  • February 28, 2024

    Energy Dept. To Give Tribes $25M For Clean Energy Tech

    The U.S. Department of Energy has said it is paying out $25 million in funds to Indigenous tribes for clean energy technology on tribal lands as part of an approximately $366 million Biden administration plan to support community-driven energy projects in rural areas.

  • February 28, 2024

    Drilling Services Co. Must Face Suit Over Worker's Injury

    A company that provides power to oil drilling operations must face an indemnification lawsuit after a worker was electrocuted while fixing a downed line, according to a Colorado federal judge's order finding that the case wouldn't interfere with the worker's injury suit.

  • February 28, 2024

    Win For DC's NFL Stadium Bid As House Approves Bill

    A bill that would clear a path for the Washington, D.C., city government to build a new stadium for the NFL's Commanders on the site of the team's former stadium was passed by the full House on Wednesday and sent to the Senate, possibly paving the way for the team to return to the city.

  • February 28, 2024

    9th Circ. Says DOL Can Use Las Vegas Data For Nev. Wages

    The Ninth Circuit has said the U.S. Department of Labor was legally able to use data for a higher-paid Nevada region when it sorted out prevailing wages in the state, turning down a bid by three construction industry-related organizations to consider geographic limitations for wages.

  • February 28, 2024

    Construction Co. Boss Gets 9 Mos. For $1M Payroll Tax Fraud

    A Boston federal judge has sentenced the owner of two Massachusetts construction companies to nine months in prison for failing to pay more than $1 million in employment taxes over a decade.

  • February 28, 2024

    Homeowners Urge Judge To Toss 'Tactical' MV Realty Ch. 11

    A committee of homeowners who signed agreements with MV Realty told a Florida bankruptcy judge on Tuesday that the company filed for Chapter 11 as a maneuver to dodge a series of state actions seeking to void predatory deals with some 40,000 homeowners in 34 states.

  • February 28, 2024

    Tribes Urge Biden To Break Silence On Pipeline Dispute

    Great Lakes tribes are pressing the White House to break its "deeply concerning" silence on a fight to remove an Enbridge Energy Corp. pipeline from tribal lands in northern Wisconsin, saying the U.S. government is sitting on the sidelines as Canada and the energy company try to gut their sovereignty.

  • February 28, 2024

    Subcontractor Seeks Sanctions In Amazon Warehouse Fight

    An electric subcontractor locked in a dispute with a construction company over delayed building of an Amazon warehouse in southern Georgia asked a Peach State federal court to penalize its opponent for "blatant discovery abuses" in the case.

  • February 28, 2024

    NC Biz Court Pares Feud Over Costly City Streetcar Expansion

    The North Carolina Business Court has narrowed a general contractor's $115 million lawsuit against the city of Charlotte stemming from a streetcar line construction project, saying the city isn't immune but that a swath of claims were otherwise filed too late.

  • February 28, 2024

    Trump Can't Freeze $465M Penalty But Can Seek Loans

    A New York state appellate judge on Wednesday refused to freeze the $465 million civil fraud judgment against Donald Trump while he appeals the award, but said the former president could take out loans to cover the cost of the judgment.  

  • February 27, 2024

    SunZia Line Injunction Needed To Save Sites, Ariz. Tribes Say

    Two Native American tribes and conservation groups seeking to halt construction of a 550-mile power line have renewed their push for a preliminary injunction, arguing that without the order, important cultural and historical sites in the San Pedro Valley will be reduced to collateral damage.

  • February 27, 2024

    Commanders Unveil Stadium Upgrades Amid Possible Move

    The Washington Commanders on Tuesday announced a total of $75 million in upgrades to its current home stadium that includes new premium seating and a new sound system, amid a battle to determine where the NFL team will play in the future.

  • February 27, 2024

    States, Businesses Aim To Kill Feds' Revised Water Rule

    States and business groups have asked a North Dakota federal judge to force the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to revise regulations intended to define the scope of the federal government's authority under the Clean Water Act.

  • February 27, 2024

    Architect May Be Negligent, But He's No Liar, Court Rules

    An intermediate Massachusetts appellate panel ruled Tuesday that a home contractor could not show an architect acted with deception or dishonesty when he repeatedly questioned the company's billing during a $2.5 million home renovation project.

  • February 27, 2024

    New Fuel Terminals Ban Doesn't Discriminate, Judge Says

    An Oregon federal judge has recommended the dismissal of a lawsuit in which Montana and a collection of fuel industry groups are challenging a ban on new oil and gas terminals in Portland, Oregon, saying there's no evidence the ban unconstitutionally discriminates against out-of-state companies.

  • February 26, 2024

    Feds, Fla. Oppose Sharing Power In Clean Water Act Program

    The federal government and Florida are now fighting over how much power each should get after a D.C. federal judge struck down the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's decision to approve the Sunshine State's bid to assume authority over a key Clean Water Act permitting program.

  • February 26, 2024

    Gas Groups Press DOE To Restart LNG Export Reviews

    Oil and gas industry groups on Monday urged the U.S. Department of Energy to lift its recent pause of approvals of liquefied natural gas exports to countries that don't have free-trade agreements with the United States, arguing that the move is illegal.

  • February 26, 2024

    Banks Say Brazil Pollution Suit In NY Is In Wrong Country

    Four leading financial institutions are urging a New York federal judge to throw out a pair of proposed class suits accusing them of enabling environmental degradation in Brazil by lending $17.2 million to Brazilian mining company Vale SA, arguing the claims don't belong in the United States because they are "all about Brazil."

  • February 26, 2024

    Caterpillar Owes $12.9M In Wirtgen IP Case, Jury Says

    A federal jury in Delaware has found that Caterpillar owes machinery manufacturer Wirtgen about $12.9 million for infringing five road-milling machine patents, counsel for Wirtgen said.

  • February 26, 2024

    Jury Awards Woodworking Co. $158K Over 'Lemon' Machine

    A Georgia federal jury has found that the manufacturer of a high-tech woodworking machine breached warranty duties to the device's buyer, awarding nearly $160,000 to a Massachusetts business that alleged it was sold a "lemon" of a machine.

  • February 26, 2024

    Estate Correctly Taxed On Insurance Payout, Justices Told

    The U.S. Supreme Court should affirm a decision denying a tax refund to the estate of an owner of a building materials company that used a payout from his $3.5 million life insurance policy to purchase his shares in the business, the federal government argued.

Expert Analysis

  • 7 Common Myths About Lateral Partner Moves

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    As lateral recruiting remains a key factor for law firm growth, partners considering a lateral move should be aware of a few commonly held myths — some of which contain a kernel of truth, and some of which are flat out wrong, says Dave Maurer at Major Lindsey.

  • Series

    Cheering In The NFL Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Balancing my time between a BigLaw career and my role as an NFL cheerleader has taught me that pursuing your passions outside of work is not a distraction, but rather an opportunity to harness important skills that can positively affect how you approach work and view success in your career, says Rachel Schuster at Sheppard Mullin.

  • A Rare Look At Judicial Interpretation Of LEG Exclusions

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    A Florida federal court’s order last month in Archer Western-De Moya v. Ace American Insurance and an earlier decision from a D.C. federal court offer insight into how courts may interpret defects exclusion clauses developed by the London Engineering Group — filling a void in case law in the area, says Jonathan Bruce at Holman Fenwick.

  • What Recent Setbacks In Court Mean For Enviro Justice

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    Two courts in Louisiana last month limited the federal government's ability to require consideration of Civil Rights Act disparate impacts when evaluating state-issued permits — likely providing a framework for opposition to environmental justice initiatives in other states, say attorneys at King & Spalding.

  • Series

    ESG Around The World: Gulf Cooperation Council

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    The Gulf Cooperation Council is in the early stages of ESG policy implementation, but recent commitments by both states and corporations — including increases in sustainable finance transactions, environmental commitments, female representation on boards and human rights enforcement — show continuing progress toward broader ESG goals, say attorneys at Cleary.

  • Steps For Companies New To Sanctions Compliance

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    Businesses newly required to implement compliance programs due to the increased breadth of mandatory sanctions and export controls, including 500 additional Russia sanctions announced last Friday, should closely follow the guidance issued by the Office of Foreign Assets Control and other regulators, say Jennifer Schubert and Megan Church at MoloLamken.

  • Contract Disputes Recap: The Terms Matter

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    Stephanie Magnell and Zachary Jacobson at Seyfarth examine recent decisions from the U.S. Civilian Board of Contract Appeals, the Armed Services Board of Contract Appeals and the U.S. Court of Federal Claims, which offer reminders about the importance of including contract terms to address the unexpected circumstances that may interfere with performance.

  • 6 Pointers For Attys To Build Trust, Credibility On Social Media

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    In an era of information overload, attorneys can use social media strategically — from making infographics to leveraging targeted advertising — to cut through the noise and establish a reputation among current and potential clients, says Marly Broudie at SocialEyes Communications.

  • A Look Ahead For The Electric Vehicle Charging Industry

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    This will likely be an eventful year for the electric vehicle market as government efforts to accelerate their adoption inevitably clash with backlash from supporters of the petroleum industry, say Rue Phillips at SkillFusion and Enid Joffe at Green Paradigm Consulting.

  • A Post-Mortem Analysis Of Stroock's Demise

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    After the dissolution of 147-year-old firm Stroock late last year shook up the legal world, a post-mortem analysis of the data reveals a long list of warning signs preceding the firm’s collapse — and provides some insight into how other firms might avoid the same disastrous fate, says Craig Savitzky at Leopard Solutions.

  • Reducing The Risk Of PFAS False Advertising Class Actions

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    A wave of class actions continues to pummel products that allegedly contain per- or polyfluoroalkyl substances, with plaintiffs challenging advertising that they say misleads consumers by implying an absence of PFAS — but there are steps companies can take to minimize risk, say attorneys at Keller and Heckman.

  • Challenges Remain In Financing Energy Transition Minerals

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    COP28, the latest U.N. climate conference, reached a consensus on a just and equitable transition from fossil fuels to renewable energy, but more action and funding will be needed to ensure that developed countries responsibly source the minerals that will be critical for this process, say attorneys at Watson Farley.

  • USCIS Fee Increases May Have Unintended Consequences

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    U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services’ new fee schedule, intended to provide the agency with needed funds while minimizing the impact of higher fees on individual immigrants and their families, shifts too much of the burden onto employers, say Juan Steevens and William Coffman at Mintz.

  • Assessing The Future Of Colorado's Economic Loss Rule

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    The Colorado Supreme Court's decision to review a state appellate court's ruling in Mid-Century Insurance Co. v. HIVE Construction will significantly influence the future of Colorado's economic loss rule, with high stakes for the cost of doing business in the state, says David Holman at Crisham & Holman.

  • Series

    Coaching High School Wrestling Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Coaching my son’s high school wrestling team has been great fun, but it’s also demonstrated how a legal career can benefit from certain experiences, such as embracing the unknown, studying the rules and engaging with new people, says Richard Davis at Maynard Nexsen.

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